When Olympus released the OM-D E-M1X, there were some complaints that it was too big and heavy for a Micro Four Thirds camera body. Those complaints came from people who appeared to misunderstand the target market for the X. It is aimed at professional wildlife, bird, and sports photographers. I own three X bodies and absolutely love them. The ergonomics are perfect for me and the IQ, processing speed, AF, are all top-notch. Not heavy or too big for me at all.

That said, I do understand the concerns from those who don’t want a larger, heavier camera body. And so does Olympus.

Enter the OM-D E-M1 Mark III.

I am a bird photographer and that means I have one very large group of people who hate my guts. The hard-core birders. These people don’t do bird photography. They merely watch birds – i.e., birdwatching. They are convinced that bird photographers are evil and that we are somehow out there harming birds. Most of them are sincere. Some of them are like the cranky old guy who runs your homeowner’s association and who lives to “catch” you violating the rules. Wannabe bird cops I call them.

The M. Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f4.0 IS PRO lens is the lens I would recommend to most photographers if they could only afford to buy one lens. It really is in a class by itself. It’s the only professional high magnification zoom to cover a 35mm equivalent 24-200mm focal range all on its own. One lens covering this wide focal range is unheard of. This Micro Four Thirds lens features premium construction and superior glass to provide spectacular optical performance. It is SUPER sharp and SUPER contrasty and performs very well in low light thanks to its 5-Axis Sync IS, the world’s most powerful image stabilization system. It has a ridiculously short close focusing distance.

The highest compliment I can pay a photographer goes something like this…

“I saw a photo on Facebook and instantly knew that it was yours.”

If you have a recognizable style. . . If you have developed and perfected a particular approach to photography over a prolonged period of time. . .If you have mastered a type of photography to the point where you are a true subject matter expert, then you have a body of work.

Music Is the Space Between the Notes

(Yes this is applies to photography too)

French composer Claude Debussy famously said, “Music is the space between the notes.” It’s a reminder that art sometimes relies on the space around it to shine.

Without that space, there is only noise, clutter, and chaos. Photographers who ascend to the heights of their craft intuitively know this, even if they cannot articulate why.