Unfortunately, the way Instagram works keeps changing and it’s tough to come up with a strategy to organically improve your interactions there.

But there is ONE thing I have tried that works for me, anyway.

Using the right hashtags and using them in the right place.

AUTHOR’S NOTE: I realized that while I often talk about my bird photography, I haven’t written many pieces about the basics of bird photography. If you have any interest in this genre, I think that this list of tips will help you save time, and improve your keeper ratio. Please let me know if there are any glaring omissions or topics you think I should have mentioned in this post.

The featured photo for this post is a simple picture of a northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) that I made in South Texas, last month. I used an Olympus 300 f/4 IS Pro Lens on an Olympus OM-D E-M1 X camera body, mounted to a RC-5570 Tripod with Uniqball UBH 45XC Ball Head with X-Cross Clamp. Triggered with an Olympus RM-CB2 Release Cable.

I am lucky that I started working as a professional photographer in the old days when there was less competition. I occasionally think about what it would be like today. In some ways, the Internet has made it easier than ever to share your work with a large audience, but it has also made it much harder to stand out since everyone with a camera wants to make some extra change from their hobby.